Chlamydia spp. in free-living domestic pigeons

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33448/rsd-v10i9.17747

Keywords:

Animal health; Chlamydiosis; Columbidae.

Abstract

Free-living Columbidae are considered the second largest reservoir of Chlamydia psittaci, transmitting the agent to humans and other animals. The present study aimed to identify the presence of Chlamydia spp. in samples of lung and stool collected from free-living domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) captured at the Mangal das Garças Naturalistic Park in Belém, Pará, Brazil, using semi-nested polymerase chain reaction, and also correlate the clinical and post-mortem findings of animals positive for Chlamydia spp. Among the 45 animals analyzed, 10 (22.2%) were positive for Chlamydia spp.; the positive findings originated from 5 (50%) lung samples and 5 (50%) stool samples, with no overlap between animals and samples. None of the animals evaluated in this study showed clinical signs of chlamydiosis; rather, these were only found during necropsy of positive animals, mainly through pulmonary, hepatic, splenic, and intestinal changes. These findings demonstrate that free-living pigeons can be reservoirs of Chlamydia spp. and transmit the agent silently to humans and animals, which is concerning for public and animal health, since these birds are easily found in urban areas cohabitating with humans, other species of birds, and other animals.

Author Biographies

Kelly Cristiny Gomes da Paixão Albuquerque, Federal University of Pará

Graduate Program of Professional Clinical Analyses, Federal University of Pará (UFPA), Belém, Pará, Brazil.

Bruna Alves Ramos, Evandro Chagas Institute

Department of Arbovirology and Hemorrhagic Fever, Evandro Chagas Institute (IEC), Ananindeua, Pará, Brazil.

Andrea Viana Cruz, Federal University of Pará

Graduate Program in Animal Health of Amazon, Federal University of Pará (UFPA)

Sandro Patroca da Silva, Evandro Chagas Institute

Department of Arbovirology and Hemorrhagic Fever, Evandro Chagas Institute (IEC), Ananindeua, Pará, Brazil

Livia Medeiros Neves Casseb, Evandro Chagas Institute

Department of Arbovirology and Hemorrhagic Fever, Evandro Chagas Institute (IEC), Ananindeua, Pará, Brazil

Jannifer Oliveira Chiang, Evandro Chagas Institute

Department of Arbovirology and Hemorrhagic Fever, Evandro Chagas Institute (IEC), Ananindeua, Pará, Brazil

Thamillys Rayssa Marques Monteiro, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Graduate Program in Residency in Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), Belém, Pará, Brazil.

Barbara Wilka Leal Silva, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Graduate Program in Residency in Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), Belém, Pará, Brazil

Camila de Cássia dos Santos, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Graduate Program in Residency in Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), Belém, Pará, Brazil.

Keila Feitosa Valente, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Graduate Program in Residency in Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), Belém, Pará, Brazil.

Pedro Henrique Marques Barrozo, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Graduate Program in Residency in Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), Belém, Pará, Brazil.

Caroliny do Socorro Brito dos Santos, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Graduate Program in Residency in Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), Belém, Pará, Brazil

Pâmela Talita de Aguiar e Silva, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Molecular Biology and Serology Laboratory, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), 66077-530, Belém, Pará, Brazil.

Elem Cristina Macedo Barra, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Molecular Biology and Serology Laboratory, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), 66077-530, Belém, Pará, Brazil.

Fernanda Monik Silva Martins, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Molecular Biology and Serology Laboratory, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), 66077-530, Belém, Pará, Brazil. 

Andréa Maria Góes Negrão, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Molecular Biology and Serology Laboratory, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), 66077-530, Belém, Pará, Brazil.

Alexandre do Rosário Casseb, Federal Rural University of the Amazon

Molecular Biology and Serology Laboratory, Institute of Animal Production and Health of the Federal Rural University of the Amazon (ISPA/UFRA), 66077-530, Belém, Pará, Brazil.

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Published

20/07/2021

How to Cite

ALBUQUERQUE, K. C. G. da P. .; RAMOS, B. A. .; CRUZ, A. V.; SILVA, S. P. da .; CASSEB, L. M. N.; CHIANG, J. O.; MONTEIRO, T. R. M.; SILVA, B. W. L. .; SANTOS, C. de C. dos; VALENTE, K. F.; BARROZO, P. H. M.; SANTOS, C. do S. B. dos; SILVA, P. T. de A. e; BARRA, E. C. M.; MARTINS, F. M. S.; NEGRÃO, A. M. G.; CASSEB, A. do R. Chlamydia spp. in free-living domestic pigeons. Research, Society and Development, [S. l.], v. 10, n. 9, p. e1710917747, 2021. DOI: 10.33448/rsd-v10i9.17747. Disponível em: https://rsdjournal.org/index.php/rsd/article/view/17747. Acesso em: 20 sep. 2021.

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Section

Agrarian and Biological Sciences